Top 5 Most Misquoted, Misused, and Misunderstood Bible Verses

You probably hear these adages all the time! But are you hearing them as they were intended? The Bible is not merely a collection of quotes, or one-liners, but is the telling of history. The Bible is a comprehensive story, from the beginning of the world to the end – not ending 2000 years ago or in the present, but at the end of the world at the return of Christ. The end is not unknown, but is already written. The Bible is a perfectly cohesive collection of 66 books by ~40 authors, and is divinely uniform. Despite the uniformity of the Bible, verses are all too often misinterpreted or quoted out of context. If I was to write, “You should never read a Bible verse,” and you were to quote that phrase by itself, you would severely misrepresent my intent if the next thing I said was, “You should always read an entire thought or even an entire chapter to properly understand a verse’s context.”

Unfortunately in our quote crazy, sound bite loving, tweet happy world, information now comes one line at a time. The reality is that chapter and verse markings were actually not added to the Bible until over 1500 years after its writing. The Bible was never intended to be read one verse at a time. Below are what seem to be the Top 5 most frequently misused “Bible verses,” that misquoted or taken apart from the context of the rest of the Bible, become tragically misunderstood.

5.  The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still.  Exodus 14:14

This verse comes out of the Exodus narrative in which the Israelites, who are fleeing their Egyptian oppressors, become trapped between the impending doom of Pharaoh’s approaching soldiers and the Red Sea. In their fear the Israelites began to cry out to Moses that they would have been better off had they never left Egypt. In the NIV translation, Moses responds by telling them not to fear, “The Lord will fight for you; you need only to be still.” This version of the verse has been lifted and placed onto a plethora of Christian items…home decor, T-shirts, bookmarks, bumper stickers, etc. Many Christians have latched onto this verse as encouragement that as they face trials in their lives they need only to wait in their current situation and the LORD will deliver them. Oddly enough, other Bible translations like the New King James and the ESV translate the verse as “The LORD will fight for you, and you shall hold your peace,” and, “The LORD will fight for you, and you have only to be silent,” respectively. These translations indicate the verse has nothing to do with holding your ground. The Hebrew word translated here does not have an English equivalent, but means all of the things stated in those 3 translations…to be still, peaceful, and silent. Basically, Moses was not telling the paranoid Israelites to stand firm, he was telling them to remain calm. This all becomes further troubling when you read the next verse (which is never included on the Christian merchandise).

Exodus 14:15 Then the Lord said to Moses, “Why are you crying out to me? Tell the Israelites to move on.

Move on?! In 14:14 Moses tells the Israelites they need only be still, and in 14:15 the LORD says to Moses, “move on.” And people have gone and quoted what Moses said here. Why is that? Moses says be still. God says get moving. And people have decided to take their reassurance in the words of Moses? Really?  Clearly we know in the Exodus story that the Jews did not stand their ground on the shore of the Red Sea…they got moving.

When we read verses 14 and 15 together it becomes far more clear that what we are being told here is that our reaction to mounting trials should be two fold. First, we are to remain calm and remain steadfast in our hearts.  Know the LORD will fight for us.  But that’s only half of the message. Don’t stop there. Second, we must move in faith. Don’t stand still! God says, Get moving!!!

Still your heart. Quiet your emotions. Trust in God. Then get moving in faith. GO!

4. This too shall pass. Ecclesiastes 3:??

This is a great proverb! But…to the surprise of many…it’s not in the Bible. Historical records often attach this phrase to a fable of a powerful king who asks assembled wise men to create a ring that will give him happiness when he is sad, and keep him from taking for granted the times when he is happy. After deliberation the sages present him a simple ring bearing the words “This too shall pass.”

The great king is humbled by the simple phrase. Jewish folklore casts King Solomon as the humbled king of the fable. Still, the fact remains, this phrase does not appear in the Bible. The portion of the Bible that most closely resembles this oft quoted piece of wisdom is chapter 3 of Ecclesiastes (authored by Solomon), which says: For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven: a time to be born, and a time to die… a time to weep, and a time to laugh…

3. Money is the root of all evil. 1 Timothy 6:10

This is a misquoting of the verse: “For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils.” In the Bible “sin” is identified as the root of all evil. Sin is any action that transgresses the mark set by God’s Holy Law. Sin is the byproduct of want. Want is bred by either fear or lack of trust in God. Lust, desire, greed, and temptation (all forms of want) stem from a lack of trust in God’s promises and a fear that God’s provision will not provide His promised perfect fullness for our lives. In the Garden of Eden we see sin first enter the world when Adam and Eve fail to trust that God has given them a perfect existence, and wanting the knowledge of God, eat the forbidden fruit. Money in and of itself is an amoral object. In the Bible Christ calls His followers to properly steward money and other resources for the furthering of the Kingdom of God. In this case, money can be used righteously. Nowhere does the Bible say it is money that is the root of evil.

It is the love of money, a sign of want and greed, that is a root of all kinds (but not all) evil.

2. I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Phillipians 4:13

The famous coffee cup verse that sends us boldly and confidently forward into our day! This verse, while extremely powerful in proper context, is typically grossly distorted from the original intent in the writing of the Apostle Paul. At the time of the writing of this letter the Apostle Paul had finally reached his desired destination of Rome, but only after being taken prisoner, shipwrecked, and placed on house arrest chained to a Roman soldier. Further he was facing potential execution, and was mentally preparing himself for the not too distant reality that He would be leaving this world. Paul is not saying here that through the strengthening of Jesus Christ we can overcome all obstacles or succeed in all things. What Paul is saying is that through the strengthening of Christ we can press forward and endure through all hardships…even death. This verse does not infer that by having faith in Christ we will achieve or prosper in all we aspire to, but rather in Christ we find the sufficient comfort and support to carry on through all adversity. The preceding verse, Phillipians 4:12 provides proper context to verse 13.

Phillipians 4:12-13 I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need. 13 I can do all things through Him who strengthens me.

1. Judge not, lest ye be judged. Matthew 7:1

The mother of all Biblical misrepresentations. Let us “twist not a scripture lest we be like the devil” (Paul Washer). The most frequently misused verse in the Bible is without question, Matthew 7:1. Often misstated as “Judge not.” or “Jesus said don’t judge.” The most humorous aspect of the misuse of this verse is that it invariable occurs in such a way that the person misusing the verse, in referencing it, actually declares a judgment on the person they feel is being judgmental. Hypocrisy much? Someone will say, “You’re being judgmental. Jesus said don’t judge.” And in their pronouncing a person as judgmental, they too have judged. Additionally, If you’re perceptive enough you will notice as well that Jesus Himself is passing judgment here on those who improperly judge. Clearly this interpretation of this verse doesn’t make sense.

The verse actually reads “Judge not that ye be not judged.” This verse is often swung as a gavel to bring about an immediate cessation of discussion of another person’s behavior. The incorrect understanding of the verse is that we are completely forbidden to call to attention any areas in others’ behaviors that demand correction. This is a clear misinterpretation of Christ’s teaching. The words of Christ:

John 7:24 “Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment.”

Matthew 7:16 “You will recognize them by their fruits…”

Luke 17:3 “Be on your guard! If your brother sins, rebuke him; and if he repents, forgive him.”

Matthew 18:15-17 “If your brother sins, go and show him his fault in private; if he listens to you, you have won your brother. 16 But if he does not listen to you, take one or two more with you, so that by the mouth of two or three witnesses every fact may be confirmed. 17 If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church; and if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector.

Clearly here, Christ says we are to judge righteously, recognize and discern good from evil by peoples’ actions, and rebuke our brothers and sisters when they sin. To rebuke a brother we must first identify that they have sinned. To identify a person’s sin, we must obviously first judge their behavior. Without the authority to judge others’ behaviors there is no permissible authority by which we could uphold governing laws, discipline children, select leaders, choose teachers and childcare providers, or discern which Bible teachers are profitable to listen to. Our selections of spouses, friends, and business partners are all based on judgments of character and ethics. Christ said, “You will know them by their fruits,” meaning we are to discern between a person who bears fruit, and a person who does not.

Leviticus 19:15 You shall do no injustice in court. You shall not be partial to the poor or defer to the great, but in righteousness shall you judge your neighbor.

To see what Jesus is actually saying when He says, “Judge not that ye be not judged,” it is helpful to read the subsequent verses:

Matthew 7:2-5 “For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the log in your own eye? 4 How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when all the time there is a log in your own eye? 5 You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.

We see now that Matthew 7:1 is not a warning against the judging of any action or behavior. It is a warning against self-deception, self righteousness, and hypocrisy.  If you are going to correct someone then you must expect to be held to the same standard.  If you judge with harshness, you can expect to be judged harshly.  If you judge with gentleness and good intent, your brothers and sisters are more likely to return the kindness.  Note that a speck of sawdust and a log are both of the same essence…wood. Jesus here is referring to the hypocrisy of casting judgment on another for a sin of the same essence as a sin of which you yourself are guilty. Jesus declares here that You must first overcome this sin in your own life before you will be any help to your brother. Notice in verse 5 that Christ does not prohibit us from pointing out our brother’s sin, or from assisting him in removing it.  Jesus does not command we say nothing about the speck in our brother’s eye. Jesus commands us to first address this particular issue in our own life, and then assist our brother in love.

1 Thessalonians 5:14 And we urge you, brothers, admonish the idle, encourage the fainthearted, help the weak, be patient with them all.

Galatians 6:1 Brothers, if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness.

**For a look at another incredibly intriguing, and perhaps unrealized, modern misquotation of the Bible, see my article on Pulp Fiction and Ezekiel 25:17

Chad W. Hussey is an average Jesus loving iconoclastic non-conformist neighborhood hope dealer – a husband, father, urban missionary, community group leader, Master of Divinity student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Community Life Intern at Sojourn Community Church in Louisville, KY.

Chad W. Hussey

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23 thoughts on “Top 5 Most Misquoted, Misused, and Misunderstood Bible Verses

  1. I found this helpful. I hear biblical verses abused all the time, even by Christians! It is odd how atheists will quote the verse on not judging yet claim that they do not believe in the bible! It shows their own hypocrisy. A believer cannot even speak about their beliefs without being accused of judging.

    • “It is odd how atheists will quote the verse on not judging yet claim they do not believe in the bible! It shows their own hypocrisy.”

      This is not hypocrisy.
      Some examples of Hypocrisy would be:

      – An Atheist stating that they believe in / serve God.
      – An Atheist preaching the word of God and trying to “save” others.
      – Someone telling others to “Judge not…”; meanwhile, they themselves
      are gossiping, criticizing, and regarding other people as inferior.

      Simply repeating a quote that reminds us to treat others well, is not declaring or suggesting that they in fact have belief in the Bible.
      It may have come from the Bible; but it has nothing to do with the belief that those were the words of God. Just like we may use a phrase that we heard in a movie, or by a particular person… it doesn’t mean that was our favorite movie or that we share any thing in common with that person.

      In summation, using this quote, has nothing to do with the Bible, any religion, or lack thereof.
      Assuming the person believes that the Bible is the word of God, then their suggestion that the use of such quotes is only reserved for those who believe in the Bible is a hypocritical view.
      Even in a non-believer, God certainly doesn’t desire the sort of judgement that this phrase is usually used to caution against. So God probably wouldn’t mind if an Atheist used it.

  2. This is a great wake up to a lot of Christians who think they know so much about these verses. I totally agree with Mel and think it’s time that Christians take this whole spiritual fight a lot more seriously.

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  4. Praise the Lord that I found this article! I had this great confusion in mind but this article cleared a lot of them up! I still have doubts about some things but I know if I read the whole chapter and not just the particular verses, I will get to know what they mean!

    I’ve seen a lot of Non-Christians quote “1. Judge not, lest ye be judged. Matthew 7:1” when Christians try to put forward their views or have put up Bible Verses that are again their views. Especially in the case of Homosexuality. For example if you read the comments section in Demi Lovato’s new video – Really don’t Care, it’s horrible. People are quoting anything from anywhere and misusing it! Even Christians! I think most of them are trying to mold the Bible into what they want it to be!

    I’ve started reading the bible recently and still am trying to figure out a lot of things, so I never post anything on such pages where Christians get told off because they posted Bible verses saying Homosexuality is an abomination, since I don’t know much about it and don’t want to say something wrong.

  5. Pingback: The Truth on Pulp Fiction Ezekiel 25:17 Samuel L. Jackson Bible QuoteTruth By Grace

  6. A couple more to add to the list…

    Jeremiah 29:11 (a promise made specifically to exiled israel)
    Matthew 18:20 (matters of church discipline)

  7. I’m afraid your interpretation of the Rest of Matthew 7 is the Misuse. The greater point is you are guilty of the same things your judging that person for you just can’t see it. Fact is it’s only Sins people want to commit they feel the need to judge others on.

  8. Hello,

    I would like to have support for the following prayer. Mom (Henriette Billard) who was 97 was hospitalized against her will for distort food roads The pneumology department did not accept her. The rhumatology department refused to keep her but transferred mom to the geriatric department.

    Then a pneumonia of inhalation was discovered. Failing to treat it or to feed mom by oral route the hospital where mom was decided not to nourish her by any mean whatsoever and the hospital refused to let mom go back home until it was sure she would die.

    Mom was authorized to come back home within a hospital at home (half a bulb of scopolamine was injected to her – I was said it was for her breathing comfort…) . She died 3 days later

    Considering that every person has the right to be treated normally whatsoever their age and that there was an injustice of which mom was the victim which should repaired (Luke 18), I ask God in the name of Jesus Christ (John 14:13) to raise up mom from the deads for some extra high quality years of life because for God nothing is impossible (John 6:19, Matthew 17:20, Matthew 19:26, Mark 10:27, Luke 1:37 (if mom would have died normally I would not ask prayers so that she may be raised up from the deads now).

    Many thanks for those who accept to support me for this.prayer.

    May God bless them.

    Philippe Billard

    More details in my blog-personal prayer request http://1resurrection.com
    When God performs this miracle I will write it on this blog.
    (you may also find there several tools for churches)

    • Explain this change Isaiah 11 vs 6. Why would it say the wolf shall dwell with the lamb ? The wolf is the Koran. The lamb Is God

      • The author is merely saying that in that day there will be peace. The Quran wasn’t written until 632 CE, over 1,000 years after the writing of Isaiah. To assume that the author is referring to the Quran is something I’m not prepared to do. Further, “the lion and lamb” is a common misquotation. The Hebrew ‘zə·’êḇ’ has been correctly rendered wolf in English translations dating back to the Geneva translation (1599) and Wycliffe Bible (1382). http://www.biblestudytools.com/wyc/

  9. Pingback: The Bible's Most Confusing Passages - Judges 19 - The Levite and His Concubine - Truth By GraceTruth By Grace

  10. Sound and biblical interpretation. Keep up your good work, God will use people with sound scriptural knowledge.
    Rev. Darwon

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